"Incredibles 2' Makes $180M, Shatters Box-Office Record for Best Opening Weekend Ever By An Animated Movie



Reddit: Box Office Week: Incredibles 2 smashes the animated film opening weekend record with a massive $180M, also making it the 8th highest domestic opening for any film. Fellow new releases can't compete with Tag opening to an okay #3 with $14.6M and Superfly limps to #7 with $6.3M.

1. Incredibles 2 — $180M (Debut)
2. Ocean’s 8 — $19.6M ($79.2M)
3. Tag — $14.6M (Debut)
4. Solo: A Star Wars Story — $9M ($192.8M)
5. Deadpool 2 — $8.8M ($294.7M)
6. Hereditary — $7M (27.2)
7. Superfly — $6.3M (Debut)
8. Avengers: Infinity War — $5.3M ($664.2M)
9. Adrift — $2.1M ($26.8M)
10. Book Club — $1.85M ($62M)


"The Man Who Killed Don Quixote": Judge Rules Director Terry Gilliam No Longer Owns Rights To The Film, Former Producer Paulo Branco Does

Gilliam and Jonathan Pryce
I really thought Terry Gilliam's excellent "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" had a happy ending, that is until a judge from the Paris Court of Appeal ruled against the director and in favor of "producer" Paulo Branco, who sued the director over the rights to the film late last year.

Gilliam and ex-producer Branco have been butting heads on the film for a few months now.

Their history together goes a few years back, when they had both reached an agreement on the production of “Quixote.” The deal was simple, Branco would fund the film, give Gilliam creative freedom and reap the benefits.

Those aforementioned benefits never came to Branco, Gilliam found another producer to finance the film, and then the film started production. 

Branco then re-entered the picture and claimed the film could not be released, let alone premiere anywhere, until he was given permission, pointing to the 2016 contract between he and Gilliam. Gilliam says the contract was nullified due to Branco not giving him any funding.
I won't go into great detail about the bad luck and mishaps that have hampered-down Terry Gilliam's passion project "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote" for the better part of three decades now. At some point, it seemed like the cursed project, which finished production on June 4th and is now practically completed in the editing room, was on course to be released this year with even a Cannes premiere booked in advance. They most definitely resolved the last setback, John Hurt's death, which was settled with Gilliam regular Jonathan Pryce taking over the role. 

The judge ordered Gilliam to pay Branco’s Alfama Films €10,000 ($11,600).

”The ruling means that the rights to the film belong to Alfama. Any exploitation of the film up until now has been completely illegal and without the authorization of Alfama,” Branco told Screen Daily.

“We will be seeking damages with interest from all the people involved in this illegal production and above all, all those who were complicit in its illegal exploitation. We’re holding everyone responsible.”

“the film’s producers, Kinology, all the others who supported the film, including those who distributed the film in France and the Cannes Film Festival, everyone.”

“The film belongs in its entirety to Alfama,” Branco added. “The film was made illegally. It’s the first time, I’ve ever seen so many people embark on a mission to produce and exploit a film, without holding the rights. It’s a unique case.”


Mindy Kaling of "Ocean's 8" says mixed reviews are 'unfair' because of mostly white male critics, Cate Banchett agrees

Image result for mindy kaling cate blanchett
I understand the anger. I understand the frustration. A week after Brie Larson criticized white male critics, "Ocean's 8" stars Mindy Kaling and Cate Blanchett are hinting that reviews for their film would have been more positive if more women were film critics.
Kaling stated that the white male critic hierarchy is “unfair”, going on to say “if I had to base my career on what white men wanted I would be very unsuccessful, so there is obviously an audience out there who want to watch things like ["Ocean’s 8"], what I work on, what Sarah [Paulson] works on.
“And the thing about so much of what this movie is, I think white men, critics would enjoy it, would enjoy my work, but often I think there is a critic who will damn it in a way because they don’t understand it, because they come at it at a different point of view, and they’re so powerful, Rotten Tomatoes.”
Blanchett, whom I hugely respect as an actress, added that: “The conversation has to change, and the media has a huge responsibility.” Blanchett has always been more subtle with her criticisms, and her words seem to have been chosen very carefully here.
"Ocean's 8" is an OK movie. It's dispensable entertainment, but a fine time at the movies for what it essentially is: A heist film with an irresistible performance courtesy of Anne Hathaway. It has made $79,175,170 two weeks since its release, not too shabby and with demos showing that primarily female audience bought tickets to see it, so, in essence, the film has become a "woman's picture" and has had its stars rally around that.
Something to really ponder; Paul Feig's "Ghostbusters" reboot was rated 74% fresh, a generous rating given the film's lackluster quality. 
Buzzfeed's Alison Willmore disagrees with Blanchett and Kaling:
Buzzfeed News critic and culture writer Alison Willmore tweeted that all women aren't the same, and you can't dismiss bad reviews because they don't come from the target audience
I understand Larson's thinking here, and, yes, "Wrinkle In Time" did garner a 40% Rotten Tomatoes rating, and, again, yes, most of the critics that reviewed it was in fact older, white male critics and not POC female critics. Her statement basically reads as an indictment of the unfairness and overall unreliability that she sees in today's film criticism, because, well, according to her at least, some movies were "made for" a specific demographic that is just not represented in today's world of film criticism.
However, objective evaluation should have NOTHING to do with identity politics, but that's what Brie is essentially mixing in here. An indisputably great film shouldn't necessarily be "made for" any particular demographic. Great art should be universal.
It’s interesting how she says that "A Wrinkle in Time" “wasn’t made” for a reviewer, specifically because of his skin color. I mean, I don’t care where you fall on the political spectrum, but that comes off as a genuinely discriminatory thing to say and, given that seemingly everyone who saw it didn't think it was very good, it's probably not the best movie to pick as an example. 
And so, with all that being said, I decided to partake in a little experiment. "A Wrinkle in Time" has 70 reviews from female film critics on Rotten Tomatoes. 35 are positive and 35 are negative, that's a 50% score. Despite the female perspective, it is still a "rotten" movie.


Gal Gadot Suits Up in New ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Images

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It took Patty Jenkins over a decade to direct her second feature film, yet her $8 million indie "Monster" out-grossed Colin Trevorrow's pre-Jurassic Park movie, Jordan Vogt-Roberts' pre-King Kong movie, and Peter Jackson's pre-LOTR movies. Combined. Her last movie "Monster," was also her debut, it even won Charlize Theron the Best Actress Oscar. The fact that Jenkins went 13 years without directing another feature film speaks volumes about Hollywood's problem with gender equality.

The massive success "Wonder Woman" had two summers ago must have given Jenkins a sweet feeling of justice prevailing. The film turned out to be the second highest grossing movie of the year, was met with rave reviews and a sequel has not only already been greenlit, but currently started shooting last week, with Jenkins and star Gal Gadot returning for more Amazonian adventures. 



"Wonder Woman" is set for a November 1st, 2019 release date. 


Tom Cruise Shut Down a Topless Scene His Costar Lea Thompson Didn't Want to Do in "All the Right Moves"

Lea Thompson And Tom Cruise In 'All The Right Moves'
Lea Thompson recently revealed that when the pair were filming 1983's All the Right Moves, Cruise shut down one of the topless scenes Thompson was supposed to do. “[The producers] wanted me to show my breasts twice in the script,” .........One of those scenes never happened, though, thanks to Cruise. "Tom managed to talk them out of one of the [nude] scenes." 
 Kudos to Cruise for standing up for his co-star. Back in 1983 as well.

What's more is, when Thompson went topless for the other scene that didn't get cut, Cruise offered to bare himself in solidarity. "In the second, he said, ‘Well, if she has to be naked, I’ll be naked, too,’" she said, adding, "That’s pretty badass! I’ve always been grateful to him for standing up to the producers.”


 [W Magazine]


John Travolta's "Gotti" has a 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes


John Travolta’s new movie “Gotti” will forever live in cinematic infamy. 
“Gotti” has scored a zero percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes from film critics, joining only a dozen other movies that have achieved the not so honorable feat. 23 reviews have been counted this far for the film, and, as of publish date, it is still had zero percent.
“That the long-gestating crime drama Gotti is a dismal mess comes as no surprise. What does shock is just how multifaceted a dismal mess it is,” Glenn Kenny wrote in his New York Times review.
I personally haven't seen the film yet, it has not been screend for critics in Boston. I might use MoviePass and buy a ticket to watch this turkey for the ages.


David Lynch: “Feature films have fallen on hard times these days. And it’s sad, but it’s the reality. I always say now, cable television is the new arthouse."

“Twin Peaks: The Return” was an unequivocal triumph for David Lynch, but we always want to know what’s next for the legendary director and in a recent interview he gave us a little hint:

“I have a box of ideas, and I’m working with producer Sabrina Sutherland, kind of trying to go through and see if there’s any gold in those boxes,” said the filmmaker.
However, don't count on it being a feature film: 

"Feature films have fallen through hard times these days. And it’s sad, but it’s the reality. I always say now, cable television is the new arthouse. People have freedom and can make a continuing story. It’s pretty beautiful, but it’s not the big screen, so there’s a little bit of sorrow in the picture and a little bit of sorrow in the sound,” he explains.
So will he go back to 'Twin Peaks"?

“Well, for right now, you could say I don’t want to talk about that.”

However, the most interesting quote for me was Lynch discussing "Fire Walk With Me" a film known as the nadir of his career, alongside "Dune," of course:

“With ‘Dune,’ I sold out on that early on, because I didn’t have final cut, and it was a commercial failure, so I died two times with that. With ‘Fire Walk With Me,’ it didn’t go over well at the time, but I loved it so I only died once, for the commercial failure and the reviews and things. But, over time, it’s changed. So now, people have revisited that film, and they feel differently about it. When a thing comes out, the feeling in the world—you could call it the collective consciousness—is a certain way, and so it dictates how the thing’s going to go. Then the collective consciousness changes and people come around. Look at Van Gogh: the guy could not sell one painting and now nobody can afford them.”


Brie Larson: "A Wrinkle in Time" got bad reviews because it “wasn’t made for” the majority older white male critics demographic.

Image result for brie larson film critics
During last night’s Crystal + Lucy Awards in NYC, Brie Larson decided to give a speech about the recent USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative which stated: "an overwhelming majority of film critics — 78% — are male, and only 22% are female." Her best defense of the findings was to mention as an example Ava DuVernay‘s "A Wrinkle in Time," which, she explains was “a love letter to women of color,” and that it acquired its bad reviews because it “wasn’t made for” the majority older white male critics demographic.
“Am I saying I hate white dudes?” Larson asked. “No, I’m not, [but if] you make the movie that is a love letter to women of color, there is an insanely low chance [that] a woman of color will have a chance to see your movie and review your movie.”
“[Audiences] are not allowed enough chances to read public discourse on these films by the people that the films were made for,” Larsen went on. “I do not need a 70-year-old white dude to tell me what didn’t work for him about "A Wrinkle in Time." It wasn’t made for him. I want to know what it meant to women of color, to biracial women, to teen women of color, to teens that are biracial.”
I understand Larson's thinking here, and, yes, "Wrinkle In Time" did garner a 40% Rotten Tomatoes rating, and, again, yes, most of the critics that reviewed it were in fact older, white male critics and not POC female critics. Her statement basically reads as an indictment of the unfairness and overall unreliability that she sees in today's film criticism, because, well, according to her at least, some movies were "made for" a specific demographic that is just not represented in today's world of film criticism.
However, objective evaluation should have NOTHING to do with identity politics, but that's what Brie is essentially mixing in here. An indisputably great film shouldn't necessarily be "made for" any particular demographic. Great art should be universal.
It’s interesting how she says that "A Wrinkle in Time" “wasn’t made” for a reviewer, specifically because of his skin color. I mean, I don’t care where you fall on the political spectrum, but that comes off as a genuinely discriminatory thing to say and, given that seemingly everyone who saw it didn't think it was very good, it's probably not the best movie to pick as an example. 
And so, with all that being said, I decided to partake in a little experiment. "A Wrinkle in Time" has 70 reviews from female film critics on Rotten Tomatoes. 35 are positive and 35 are negative, that's a 50% score. Despite the female perspective, it is still a "rotten" movie.


    Ewan McGregor to Play Danny Torrance in ‘Shining’ Sequel ‘Dr. Sleep’

    Director Mike Flanagan has cast Ewan McGregor as Danny Torrance with Stephen King's blessing.
    Ewan McGregor will be visiting the Overlook Hotel in an upcoming movie in "Doctor Sleep."
    Variety is reporting that a sequel to Stanley Kubrick's "The Shining" is currently in the works and that McGregor will star as the adult version Danny Torrence. Torrence, if you don't remember, was the kid that kept uttering REDRUM and that had daddy chasing him all over the maze-like hotel with an ax. 

    McGregor got the role over Chris Evans, Matt Smith, and Jeremy Renner.
    The film is a Warner Bros.’ adaptation of Stephen King’s 2013 follow-up to The Shining and will have director Mike Flanagan ("Oculus," "Ouija: Origin of Evil," and "Gerald’s Game") helming the project. 
    Flanagan is no stranger to King having adapted the author's novel "Gerald’s Game" for Netflix. The screenplay for "Doctor Sleep" had been originally written by Akiva Goldsman ("A Beautiful Mind"), but, according to Variety, Flanagan has rewritten most of it.

    If Flanagan follows the novel's plot, then "Dr. Sleep" will pick up decades after the tragic events of "The Shining," with Torrence, now an alcoholic with anger issues, starting to sober up, and consequentially having his psychic powers returning. He decides to use his special abilities to help terminally ill patients in a hospice, where he inherits the nickname of Dr. Sleep. But it's his obsession with a particular patient, a little girl with special powers herself, that kicks off the plot.

    Flanagan will always be fine in my books just for directing 2016's excellent creepfest "Hush."