Mel Gibson's 'Passion of the Christ' Sequel Titled 'Resurrection'

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Mel Gibson has revealed the title of what might be his next directorial film: The Passion of the Christ: Resurrection. Yes, you heard that right, a sequel to his 2004 mega-hit "The Passion of the Christ." The film made $612 Million on a scant $30 Million budget. One of the most succesful independent films of all-time and lots of $$$$ for its studio Newmarket. 

The actor revealed his plans about the sequel on Stephen Colbert's "Late Show" on Tuesday. He'll be working with Braveheart screenwriter Randall Wallace on the screenplay and consider us intrigued. Although passion divided critics it was an eye-opening account of the last days of Jesus Christ. I'm not a believe in anything, but the film was gripping and as horrific as any horror movie out at that time.

 "It’s not just some chronological telling of just that event. That could be boring, and you think, ‘Oh, we read that,' "But what are the other things around it that happened?"

 "It’s probably about three years off, because it’s a big subject,"It’s more than a single event, it’s an amazing event, And to underpin that with the things around it is really the story, to enlighten what that means. It’s not just about the event; it’s not just some chronological telling of just that event. That could be boring, and you think, ‘Oh, we read that.'... But what are the other things around it that happened?"

Additionally, the film's villains "are in another realm, Sure, you’re going all over the place. What happened in three days?... I’m not sure, but it’s worth thinking about. Get your imagination going."


A snippet of what I had to say about "Passion of the Christ" back in the day:

"Mel Gibson isn’t scared of showing violence in the movies he directs. Apocalypto and Braveheart could have both been on this list, but instead we’ll settle for The Passion of the Christ. The Bible isn’t tame on violence and the film makes us well aware of that, recounting Jesus’ final days of suffering before his ultimate crucifixion. There are only three sentences in the Bible that mention the flogging of Jesus and yet Gibson dedicates more than 10 minutes of screentime to Jesus getting whipped until he collapses. The crucifixion scene isn’t any better, as Gibson apparently wants the audience to feel the pain as much as possible. However, Gibson has stated that he believes that The Bible describes a far more horrific crucifixion than the movie. The film is shocking, extreme, and tries to make you see the – as the director of the film has stated – “enormity of the sacrifice”. The brutality onscreen had audiences not only seeing the sacrifice, but feeling it as well."
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